China wholesaler Desktop Lab Water Circulating Vacuum Pump vacuum pump diy

Product Description

Product Description

This product is a new kind of multi-use vacuum pump designed on the basis of the principle of generating negative pressure by using the jet flow and using the recycled water as the working fluid, which can provide the vacuum conditions for chemical experiments, and recirculated cooling water for the reaction equipment.

 

 

 

Product features

Obvious water-saving effect. The water added into the water tank can be recycled for the water cycle operation, which overcomes the shortcoming of wasting a lot of water to generate a vacuum environment by directly discharging the tap water. Actual measurement results show: supposing the continuous operation within a working day, under the condition of CHINAMFG the same vacuum environment, the use of this product can save more than 8 tons of water; in addition, the water added once can be used for a long term, which is especially applicable to such places as the area of lacking water resources or laboratories with inadequate water pressure.
Multi-functional and integrated roles. This product, besides providing the vacuum conditions, can also equally perform the external cycle operation and provide recirculated cooling water for the reaction equipment. After being connected to the tap water and injected appropriate amount of water for supplement, this product can maintain the water temperature and water quality inside vacuum pump under the condition of continuous operation for a long time, that is to say, ensure the decrease of vacuum degree and also achieve the supply of recirculated cooling water.
Novelty appearance and easy usage. The pump head of this product can be directly immersed in water. The complete machine is characterized by low height, small size, light weight and convenient movement, can be put on the workbench, easy for operation and observation. Its upper cover of water tank cover is installed flexibly, and can be opened, which facilitates the adding of water and maintenance.
Individual or simultaneous air pumping operation for the installation of 5 suction mouths. Each suction mouth is equipped with a vacuum meter for the convenient observation of vacuum degree. The suction pipeline is equipped with check valves to prevent the recycled water from backing into the equipment of being vacuumized in case of accidental shut down in the process of vacuum operation.
Corrosion-resistant and pollution-free. The pump of this product is made of stainless steel, not subject to the influence of acid-base corrosion materials, and equally not going to produce any greasy dirt and impurities and so on that will pollute the laboratory.
Stable and reliable operation and low noise.
 

Product Parameters

 

Model B95
Pumping capacity 100L/min
Storage tank 57L
Vacuum degree -0.096Mpa
Motor power 550W
Voltage  1ph 110V/120V/220V 50-60Hz
Dimension 45*35*82cm
Weight 9.6kg
Pump head 12m

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After-sales Service: Provided
Warranty: 12months
Oil or Not: Oil Free
Vacuum Degree: High Vacuum
Work Function: Pre-Suction Pump
Name: Vacuum Pump
Samples:
US$ 350/Piece
1 Piece(Min.Order)

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Customization:
Available

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vacuum pump

What Is the Role of Vacuum Pumps in Semiconductor Manufacturing?

Vacuum pumps play a critical role in semiconductor manufacturing processes. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Semiconductor manufacturing involves the production of integrated circuits (ICs) and other semiconductor devices used in various electronic applications. Vacuum pumps are used extensively throughout the semiconductor manufacturing process to create and maintain the required vacuum conditions for specific manufacturing steps.

Here are some key roles of vacuum pumps in semiconductor manufacturing:

1. Deposition Processes: Vacuum pumps are used in deposition processes such as physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These processes involve depositing thin films of materials onto semiconductor wafers to create various layers and patterns. Vacuum pumps help create a low-pressure environment necessary for precise control of the deposition process, ensuring uniform and high-quality film formation.

2. Etching and Cleaning: Vacuum pumps are utilized in etching and cleaning processes, which involve the removal of specific layers or contaminants from semiconductor wafers. Dry etching techniques, such as plasma etching and reactive ion etching, require a vacuum environment to facilitate the ionization and removal of material. Vacuum pumps aid in creating the necessary low-pressure conditions for efficient etching and cleaning processes.

3. Ion Implantation: Ion implantation is a process used to introduce impurities into specific regions of a semiconductor wafer to modify its electrical properties. Vacuum pumps are used to evacuate the ion implantation chamber, creating the required vacuum environment for accurate and controlled ion beam acceleration and implantation.

4. Wafer Handling and Transfer: Vacuum pumps are employed in wafer handling and transfer systems. These systems utilize vacuum suction to securely hold and manipulate semiconductor wafers during various manufacturing steps, such as loading and unloading from process chambers, robotic transfer between tools, and wafer alignment.

5. Load Lock Systems: Load lock systems are used to transfer semiconductor wafers between atmospheric conditions and the vacuum environment of process chambers. Vacuum pumps are integral components of load lock systems, creating and maintaining the vacuum conditions necessary for wafer transfer while minimizing contamination risks.

6. Metrology and Inspection: Vacuum pumps are utilized in metrology and inspection tools used for characterizing semiconductor devices. These tools, such as scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) and focused ion beam (FIB) systems, often operate in a vacuum environment to enable high-resolution imaging and accurate analysis of semiconductor structures and defects.

7. Leak Detection: Vacuum pumps are employed in leak detection systems to identify and locate leaks in vacuum chambers, process lines, and other components. These systems rely on vacuum pumps to evacuate the system and then monitor for any pressure rise, indicating the presence of leaks.

8. Cleanroom Environment Control: Semiconductor manufacturing facilities maintain cleanroom environments to prevent contamination during the fabrication process. Vacuum pumps are used in the design and operation of the cleanroom ventilation and filtration systems, helping to maintain the required air cleanliness levels by removing particulates and maintaining controlled air pressure differentials.

Vacuum pumps used in semiconductor manufacturing processes are often specialized to meet the stringent requirements of the industry. They need to provide high vacuum levels, precise control, low contamination levels, and reliability for continuous operation.

Overall, vacuum pumps are indispensable in semiconductor manufacturing, enabling the creation of the necessary vacuum conditions for various processes, ensuring the production of high-quality semiconductor devices.

vacuum pump

Considerations for Selecting a Vacuum Pump for Cleanroom Applications

When it comes to selecting a vacuum pump for cleanroom applications, several considerations should be taken into account. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Cleanrooms are controlled environments used in industries such as semiconductor manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and microelectronics. These environments require strict adherence to cleanliness and particle control standards to prevent contamination of sensitive processes or products. Selecting the right vacuum pump for cleanroom applications is crucial to maintain the required level of cleanliness and minimize the introduction of contaminants. Here are some key considerations:

1. Cleanliness: The cleanliness of the vacuum pump is of utmost importance in cleanroom applications. The pump should be designed and constructed to minimize the generation and release of particles, oil vapors, or other contaminants into the cleanroom environment. Oil-free or dry vacuum pumps are commonly preferred in cleanroom applications as they eliminate the risk of oil contamination. Additionally, pumps with smooth surfaces and minimal crevices are easier to clean and maintain, reducing the potential for particle buildup.

2. Outgassing: Outgassing refers to the release of gases or vapors from the surfaces of materials, including the vacuum pump itself. In cleanroom applications, it is crucial to select a vacuum pump with low outgassing characteristics to prevent the introduction of contaminants into the environment. Vacuum pumps specifically designed for cleanroom use often undergo special treatments or use materials with low outgassing properties to minimize this effect.

3. Particle Generation: Vacuum pumps can generate particles due to the friction and wear of moving parts, such as rotors or vanes. These particles can become a source of contamination in cleanrooms. When selecting a vacuum pump for cleanroom applications, it is essential to consider the pump’s particle generation level and choose pumps that have been designed and tested to minimize particle emissions. Pumps with features like self-lubricating materials or advanced sealing mechanisms can help reduce particle generation.

4. Filtration and Exhaust Systems: The filtration and exhaust systems associated with the vacuum pump are critical for maintaining cleanroom standards. The vacuum pump should be equipped with efficient filters that can capture and remove any particles or contaminants generated during operation. High-quality filters, such as HEPA (High-Efficiency Particulate Air) filters, can effectively trap even the smallest particles. The exhaust system should be properly designed to ensure that filtered air is released outside the cleanroom or passes through additional filtration before being reintroduced into the environment.

5. Noise and Vibrations: Noise and vibrations generated by vacuum pumps can have an impact on cleanroom operations. Excessive noise can affect the working environment and compromise communication, while vibrations can potentially disrupt sensitive processes or equipment. It is advisable to choose vacuum pumps specifically designed for quiet operation and that incorporate measures to minimize vibrations. Pumps with noise-dampening features and vibration isolation systems can help maintain a quiet and stable cleanroom environment.

6. Compliance with Standards: Cleanroom applications often have specific industry standards or regulations that must be followed. When selecting a vacuum pump, it is important to ensure that it complies with relevant cleanroom standards and requirements. Considerations may include ISO cleanliness standards, cleanroom classification levels, and industry-specific guidelines for particle count, outgassing levels, or allowable noise levels. Manufacturers that provide documentation and certifications related to cleanroom suitability can help demonstrate compliance.

7. Maintenance and Serviceability: Proper maintenance and regular servicing of vacuum pumps are essential for their reliable and efficient operation. When choosing a vacuum pump for cleanroom applications, consider factors such as ease of maintenance, availability of spare parts, and access to service and support from the manufacturer. Pumps with user-friendly maintenance features, clear service instructions, and a responsive customer support network can help minimize downtime and ensure continued cleanroom performance.

In summary, selecting a vacuum pump for cleanroom applications requires careful consideration of factors such as cleanliness, outgassing characteristics, particle generation, filtration and exhaust systems, noise and vibrations, compliance with standards, and maintenance requirements. By choosing vacuum pumps designed specifically for cleanroom use and considering these key factors, cleanroom operators can maintain the required level of cleanliness and minimize the risk of contamination in their critical processes and products.

vacuum pump

Can Vacuum Pumps Be Used in Laboratories?

Yes, vacuum pumps are extensively used in laboratories for a wide range of applications. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Vacuum pumps are essential tools in laboratory settings as they enable scientists and researchers to create and control vacuum or low-pressure environments. These controlled conditions are crucial for various scientific processes and experiments. Here are some key reasons why vacuum pumps are used in laboratories:

1. Evaporation and Distillation: Vacuum pumps are frequently used in laboratory evaporation and distillation processes. By creating a vacuum, they lower the boiling point of liquids, allowing for gentler and more controlled evaporation. This is particularly useful for heat-sensitive substances or when precise control over the evaporation process is required.

2. Filtration: Vacuum filtration is a common technique in laboratories for separating solids from liquids or gases. Vacuum pumps create suction, which helps draw the liquid or gas through the filter, leaving the solid particles behind. This method is widely used in processes such as sample preparation, microbiology, and analytical chemistry.

3. Freeze Drying: Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in freeze drying or lyophilization processes. Freeze drying involves removing moisture from a substance while it is in a frozen state, preserving its structure and properties. Vacuum pumps facilitate the sublimation of frozen water directly into vapor, resulting in the removal of moisture under low-pressure conditions.

4. Vacuum Ovens and Chambers: Vacuum pumps are used in conjunction with vacuum ovens and chambers to create controlled low-pressure environments for various applications. Vacuum ovens are used for drying heat-sensitive materials, removing solvents, or conducting reactions under reduced pressure. Vacuum chambers are utilized for testing components under simulated space or high-altitude conditions, degassing materials, or studying vacuum-related phenomena.

5. Analytical Instruments: Many laboratory analytical instruments rely on vacuum pumps to function properly. For example, mass spectrometers, electron microscopes, surface analysis equipment, and other analytical instruments often require vacuum conditions to maintain sample integrity and achieve accurate results.

6. Chemistry and Material Science: Vacuum pumps are employed in numerous chemical and material science experiments. They are used for degassing samples, creating controlled atmospheres, conducting reactions under reduced pressure, or studying gas-phase reactions. Vacuum pumps are also used in thin film deposition techniques like physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

7. Vacuum Systems for Experiments: In scientific research, vacuum systems are often designed and constructed for specific experiments or applications. These systems can include multiple vacuum pumps, valves, and chambers to create specialized vacuum environments tailored to the requirements of the experiment.

Overall, vacuum pumps are versatile tools that find extensive use in laboratories across various scientific disciplines. They enable researchers to control and manipulate vacuum or low-pressure conditions, facilitating a wide range of processes, experiments, and analyses. The choice of vacuum pump depends on factors such as required vacuum level, flow rate, chemical compatibility, and specific application needs.

China wholesaler Desktop Lab Water Circulating Vacuum Pump   vacuum pump diyChina wholesaler Desktop Lab Water Circulating Vacuum Pump   vacuum pump diy
editor by CX 2024-03-01

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